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The annual Grace Hopper Conference is just one week away! Before the festivities officially kick off, we’re shining the spotlight on several Google Women Engineers (GWEs) who have been nominated by Googlers for the great work that they do and the contributions they have made as women in the tech industry.

Today, we’re featuring Jennifer Mace.


Can you share with us your role at Google?
I’m a Site Reliability Engineer at Google - that means I’m a software engineer who works closely with our serving systems as a whole, designing traffic flow and large-scale system interactions to keep Google’s services running. A typical day’s work could see me writing automation software in Python, working with developers to tweak their new feature’s scalability and reliability, or implementing monitoring and configuration changes across our system.

What do you enjoy most about being a woman in tech (or at Google specifically)?
I love being a GWE (a Google Woman Engineer) with my team because I love the eagle-eye view we have over our serving stack, and the freedom we have to design solutions to interesting problems. I also love my team in particular because they never make me feel unusual for being a technical woman, and they passionately support diversity in software - in fact, of my two-dozen teammates, seven will be joining me at Grace Hopper, and three of those seven are guys.

What are you looking forward to most at the Grace Hopper Conference?
Last year was my first Grace Hopper, and the strongest thing that inspired me about that amazing experience were all the brilliant women who refused to settle for being ‘comfortable’. Well, in the year since then, I’ve volunteered to lead a team, given technical talks around the US and the UK, and even wrote a novel! As we like to say at Google, I’m ‘uncomfortably excited’ to see what this year’s Grace Hopper will teach me. I hope I'll see you there!

To follow the fun at Grace Hopper and the lead-up to the celebration, check out Google Students on Google+ and Twitter using our #GoogleGHC14 hashtag. Stay tuned for more GWE spotlights here on our blog.

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The annual Grace Hopper Conference is just one week away! Before the festivities officially kick off, we’re shining the spotlight on several Google Women Engineers (GWEs) who have been nominated by Googlers for the great work that they do and the contributions they have made as women in the tech industry.

Today, we’re featuring Sri Velagapudi.


Can you share with us your role at Google?
I have been with Google for over four years and have been a software engineer for over 11. I currently work in an interesting overlap between Google search and Google Now on Android/IOS.

What do you enjoy most about being a woman in tech (or at Google specifically)?
I enjoy being in tech because it allows for a lot of creative freedom with minimal setup cost. Google takes that further by facilitating side projects and even providing a platform to share through demo sessions! I am happy to be a woman in tech at a time when everyone recognizes the importance of tech education and diversity within tech. I have met several inspiring engineers along the way and I hope to meet many more.

What are you looking forward to most at the Grace Hopper Conference?
Last year, I presented a poster on Stereotype Threat and attended several interesting sessions including a speed-mentoring session. That is where I met many several senior technologists and also met a student that then joined my team as a summer intern!

This year, a few of us are presenting a session on how to do good (for the world) while also improving your tech portfolio. I am really looking forward to this. Working on pet projects provides a safe place to experiment, take risks, fail, try again and learn. Our goal in this session is to help participants understand the importance of this process and to help them select a project that also gives back to society.

This year's GHC is even larger, so I am waiting to simply absorb the enthusiasm and excitement. If I had to pick, however, I would say I am very eager about the poster session. I am always impressed by the kind of interesting problems presented and the elegant solutions that are offered. It fills my stomach with butterflies.

Also, this year, my mother and my cousin are both presenting posters for the very first time. I look forward to cheering them on.

To follow the fun at Grace Hopper and the lead-up to the celebration, check out Google Students on Google+ and Twitter using our #GoogleGHC14 hashtag. Stay tuned for more GWE spotlights here on our blog.

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The annual Grace Hopper Celebration is just one week away! Before the festivities officially kick off, we’re shining the spotlight on several Google Women Engineers (GWEs) who have been nominated by Googlers for the great work that they do and the contributions they have made as women in the tech industry.

Today, we’re featuring Sabrina Williams!


Can you share with us your role at Google?
I am what we call a Software Engineer in Test (SET) at Google. The title can be a little misleading - people often think that we focus on writing tests, but that isn’t quite true. We SETs are a specialized version of the typical Software Engineer (SWE); whereas a SWE focuses on creating products for our users, a SET focuses on creating tools, frameworks, and processes that make our engineers more productive. I currently work in the Ads Engineering Productivity group, but I've also been a SET on Google Cloud Print and Google Glass. Some of our focuses include code health, release efficiency, test efficacy, and designing for testability.

What do you enjoy most about being a woman in tech (or at Google specifically!)?
I have been afforded so many opportunities to meet some spectacular women who have had a positive effect on me, both professionally and personally. Just as some have served as a role model for me, I try to be a good role model for others. It is nice to be part of such a positive cycle. For example, I am currently on rotation with the Google-in-Residence program where I am teaching computer science courses at Howard University. Speaking of teaching (shameless plug), you should totally come to my talk next Friday afternoon that I’m giving at Grace Hopper on Test-Driven Development. It’ll be super fun.

What are you looking forward to most at the Grace Hopper Celebration?
Come see us at the Career Fair to find out more about the various types of software engineering roles we have available. It may be a mob scene at the Google booth, but it is my favorite part of the conference because I get to meet a ton of bright, talented women (even some future Googlers!). In fact, that’s one of my favorite things about being at Google.

To follow the fun at Grace Hopper and the lead-up to the celebration, check out Google Students on Google+ and Twitter using our #GoogleGHC14 hashtag! Stay tuned for more GWE spotlights here on our blog!

Posted by Shawn Dye, University Programs Team

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Google is excited to announce their presence at the upcoming Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, sponsored by the Anita Borg Institute in Phoenix, Arizona on October 8-10, 2014. Google has been attending the Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC) for over a decade, and we are proud to show our long-standing dedication to this conference by partnering at the highest level as a Visionary Platinum Sponsor. Google has been working with the Anita Borg Institute (ABI) since 2004, and Alan Eustace, Senior Vice President, Knowledge joined the ABI board in 2005 and continues to sit on the ABI Board of Trustees. Google has been recognized as an official ABI partner since 2006.

GHC is the largest gathering of women in tech and their allies, and we plan on showing our support by bringing 500 Googlers in various capacities. Our participants include engineers, who will be leading panels and talks, and People Operations experts who will be answering questions about available roles and processes.

In addition to the events taking place and a constant presence at the career fair, we will also be holding a series of events each evening, including receptions celebrating Black and Latina women in technical roles.

We look forward to celebrating with everyone attending Grace Hopper in Phoenix next week. Please stop by booth 716 to check out the Google self-driving car, test out Cardboard and speak with Googlers who are excited to meet you!

To follow the fun at Grace Hopper and the lead-up to the celebration, check out Google Students on Google+ and Twitter using our #GoogleGHC14 hashtag. Remember to check back here for stories of GWEs (Google Women Engineers) and more about our plans at the conference.


Posted by Sidnie Davis, University Programs Team

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From Google Glass to Project Loon, Adwords to Docs, our interns have the opportunity to work on some of Google’s most cutting edge and innovative projects. Interns also work across sales and other business functions, bringing a fresh perspective to the work done at Google. To show you just how much of an impact interns make and to highlight their unique experiences, we’re bringing you a special blog series: Google Intern Insights. Make sure to stroll through the blog to check out other interns who have been featured on the blog throughout the summer! Also, our technical internships for summer 2015 are now open! Apply here.

Josep Ballester studies Industrial Engineering at the Polytechnic University of Catalonia in Barcelona, Spain.


Tell us one fun, outlandish fact about you!
I have a twin brother.

What inspired you to apply for this internship, and what made Google appealing to you as a potential intern?
I initially applied for a Google internship because of my love for Google products. I believed that Google would allow me to work on cool things with exceptional people. When the opportunity to intern came, I took it without a doubt.

What team are you working on at Google? Can you provide us with a high-level description of your summer project?
I work on the Small and Medium Businesses (SMB) Services team, helping advertisers improve their businesses. My specific project revolves around improving customer satisfaction.

What’s the best part about working with your team?
They are always easy to work with and we've all become good friends.

Outside of being a Google intern, what are some fun things you do outside the classroom/office throughout the year?
I love to travel. It really doesn't matter where. I just like to learn new things and meet new people. I also really like to ski.

We all know Googlers and interns love the food and the other benefits. Outside of some of the well-known perks, what’s your favorite part about working at Google?
 First, the people. Everyone is super kind and helpful. I also like the fact that interns work right alongside full-time employees.


Best overheard conversation in a MK/cafe/elevator
I once had breakfast next to a Googler I didn’t know and we ended up chatting. A few days later, I found out that he’s an important manager.

What’s something you’ve accomplished during your internship (thus far) that you’re most proud of? Or something you’re looking forward to working on?
Throughout my internship, all of the customers I’ve interacted with have given me positive feedback.

Dream Google office to visit?
Headquarters in Mountain View, California.

What does “being Googley” mean to you?
Being Googley means always thinking about what you can do to improve things. Be involved in what you like and what you do.

If you could give one piece of advice to potential student applicants, what would it be?
First of all, apply! Don’t be afraid and also apply as early as possible. Make sure to prepare for the interviews and don’t forget to be yourself!

Best gFit class?
It’s not a class but having a swimming pool in the office is awesome!

What were your biggest concerns when relocating for the position when it comes to accessibility?
The public transportation and housing accommodations in Dublin. You have to be comfortable in order to work well!

If a student with mobility restrictions were reluctant to consider a position at Google, what would you tell them?
That there's no need to worry - Googlers are very helpful. Also, Google’s buildings are the most accessible buildings I have ever been in ... seriously.

Want to learn more about internships at Google? Check out our Student Careers Site. Additionally, follow Google Students on Google+ and use the hashtag #googleinterns to keep up with Intern Insights this summer.


Posted by Maggie Hohlfeld, University Programs Team

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From Google Glass to Project Loon, Adwords to Docs, our interns have the opportunity to work on some of Google’s most cutting edge and innovative projects. Interns also work across sales and other business functions, bringing a fresh perspective to the work done at Google. To show you just how much of an impact interns make and to highlight their unique experiences, we’re bringing you a special blog series: Google Intern Insights. Make sure to stroll through the blog to check out other interns who have been featured on the blog throughout the summer! Also, our technical internships for summer 2015 are now open! Apply here.


Tell us one fun, outlandish fact about you!
For a few years during my childhood, I would go to the pet store and buy feeder mice just so I could raise them and give them a life that didn’t involve becoming a snake's dinner.

What inspired you to apply for this internship, and what made Google appealing to you as a potential intern?
I interned at Google in Mountain View during the summer of 2012 and had a good experience. The next summer, I interviewed again for a Google internship. After having a bad experience during the interview that was out of my control, I decided to cut my losses and declined a second interview. I looked for other opportunities after it didn't work out with Google and ended up receiving a Turing Fellowship for the summer. It allowed me to intern for a startup in NYC and I had a fantastic time. If any advice were to come out of this, it would be to apply for internships as early as possible! Especially if you're applying for a smaller internship program. The earlier you apply, the more hosts are available for you to potentially match with, and the more buffer time is available should something go wrong along the way.

What has been your path to your current internship at Google?
I was briefly introduced to computer science in high school and thought artificial intelligence was really cool. I decided to become a CS major in college, and then applied for my first Google internship as a freshman on a whim. The summer after my sophomore year, I was awarded a Turing Fellowship and matched with an ed-tech startup in NYC called Knewton. I interned at Knewton for the summer and then stayed on as a part-time software engineer during the school year. I really liked working in the city and wanted to get a taste of a slightly different focus, which is where my current internship on the Cloud team at Google comes in.

What team are you working on at Google? Can you provide us with a high-level description of your summer project?
I’m working on the Google Cloud Platform, specifically within Developer Projects. My main project this summer was to integrate projects so that users can manage their Cloud Projects right from the command line.

Favorite Doogler?
The beautiful Harlow, even though she breaks my heart by living on the other side of the continent in SF.


What’s the best part about working with your manager? What about your team?
My manager, Dave, is really goofy and easy to talk to, and he always has great input. The rest of my team is on the west coast and Google makes it easy to work remotely, so I was lucky enough to spend a few weeks visiting them. They range from sassy to stoic, but each and every one is so kind, approachable, and beyond intelligent, which are invaluable qualities in a co-worker.

Best gFit class?
That’s really tough. I’ve tried the majority of the ones here in NYC, and I have to say the classes I will miss the most are Kerry Ann King’s wacky, yet brilliant themed boot camps, and Stephen Moore’s invigorating yoga.

We all know Googlers and interns love the food and the other benefits. Outside of some of the well-known perks, what’s your favorite part about working at Google?
This internship has been my favorite so far because I'm genuinely happy to go to work everyday. There are two perks that contribute to this: 1) I love my team. I went through a few rounds of host-matching before I found one I thought I'd mesh with, and though it was a bit nerve-wrecking, it made all the difference in my desire to go work each day. 2) The fitness classes are way too good. It's great to be able to spend an hour a day just clearing my head and then conveniently go right back to work.

What’s something you’ve accomplished during your internship (thus far) that you’re most proud of? Or something you’re looking forward to working on?
I was able to complete my project about a month early and release it to Google users to test. Getting positive feedback and questions about it from other Googlers I didn't even know was such a good feeling, since it affirmed that my work actually mattered and helped people. I'm excited for it to be publicly available.

Best intern event you’ve attended?
The NYC kick-off summer intern event was a boat cruise. But we were actually on a dock. There was a small boat tied off, but we weren't allowed on it!

What does “being Googley” mean to you?
To me it simply means being a good person and having a desire to make users' lives easier.

If you could give one piece of advice to potential student applicants, what would it be?
Practice your technical interview skills! If you know your stuff and can express that eloquently, you'll kill it.


Want to learn more about internships at Google? Check out our Student Careers Site. Additionally, follow Google Students on Google+ and use the hashtag #googleinterns to keep up with Intern Insights this summer.


Posted by Maggie Hohlfeld, University Programs Team

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Chromebooks are college-bound this fall. Introducing the Chromebook Lending Library.

The Chromebook Lending Library is traveling to 12 college campuses across the U.S. loaded with the latest Chromebooks. The Lending Library is a bit like your traditional library, but instead of books, we're letting students borrow Chromebooks (no library card needed). Students can use a Chromebook during the week for life on campus— whether it’s in class, during an all-nighter, or browsing the internet in their dorm.

Chromebooks are a new type of computer that helps students get things done faster and easier. They have the battery life you need to study all night and are light enough to slip easily into a bag or backpack. With Google Maps, Drive, and Gmail, important information is stored in the cloud, so students no longer need to worry about losing documents, pics, music, and more. The days of losing a paper are over!

We hope you can swing by the Chromebook Lending Library for a little study break this fall. Check out chromebook.com/forcollege for all the details and spread the word with #ChromebookforCollege. And if the tour isn’t hitting your campus this fall, you can follow along on Twitter and Google+.






(Cross-posted on the Google Education Blog.)